Humanities


Humanities at Lilydale High School

The Humanities faculty is an important element of the curriculum of Lilydale High school. We offer a wide range of subjects which cater to all needs.

 

Junior School

Year 7

History

In Year 7 students will be introduced to the world of History.  They will come to understand how past events have shaped the world we know today.  Students will look at evidence from that era to come to an understanding of what life was like in these times. Students will compare Ancient Societies’ daily life, social features and government with people in the modern world.

Geography

Year 7 students will look at physical processes, human interaction and management of water and oil as resources. Students will investigate the interaction of human activities with the resources ensuring the sustainability of resources. Students will also be studying population’s movements. This unit will also focus on the development of geographic skills and techniques in order to apply geographical knowledge to the sustainable use of resources. They will also understand the concepts of mapping.

Year 8 

Geography

Students undertake the study of mountain landscapes and the effects of culture and society on Australia. This unit will also focus on the development of geographic skills and techniques in order to apply geographical knowledge to the understanding of human and natural geography.

History

Students study Medieval Europe, Medieval Japan and the Black Death.  As well as studying how people lived in these times, students come to see the reasons why certain events in world history occurred and how they helped shape the world we know today.  Students compare two Medieval Societies (daily life, social features and government).

 

Middle School

Year 9

History

Students undertake the study of Australian history.  They learn about how Australia developed in terms of social, political and cultural structures and traditions.  Students examine the impact of European colonisation of Australia. They will also be investigating World War 1.

Geography

Geography students study the physical and human environments from a spatial perspective.  Students will study a major natural system that is part of the biosphere or atmosphere such as weather, the hydrological cycle and plate tectonics.

Economics

The discipline of Economics will enable students to understand how wealth is generated and distributed.  Students understand how businesses and markets operate and how the nation’s work economy operates.

Learning to Lead (Elective)

Learning to Lead aims to develop student’s leadership, communication, teamwork, self discipline and organisation skills, as well as enhance their understanding of the wider community.

Year 10

Geography

Your World Your Future (elective)

This course considers sustainability as a central pillar to the world’s future. In this area of study students explore issues such as climate change, tourism including resource use and management and how a sustainable future ensures equity across the world. . Students will study the challenges posed by the natural world and by its use by humans. Students will also be provided with the opportunities to reflect on whether our current ways of thinking and living are sustainable.

Today’s Actions, Tomorrow’s Future (elective)

This course offer’s an insight into the issues that shape our “globalised world.” This unit will focus on how patterns of population, urbanisation, economic change, consumption, environmental waste and pollution affect our behaviours and the natural earth systems.

History

Gallipoli to Kokoda (elective)

This unit will focus on the First and Second World Wars, with an emphasis on Australia’s involvement in both conflicts. Students will examine the causes of both wars and the events that drew Australia into participation. Students will also develop their knowledge of Australia’s role in world affairs.

Clash of the Superpowers (elective)

This unit covers the conclusion of World War Two and the subsequent development of competing superpowers. Students will learn about the rivalry between Communism and Capitalism and their impact on world conflicts during the latter part of the 20th Century. Students will learn about the impact of the Cold War on Australia’s History and about Australia’s involvement in the wars in Vietnam and Korea wars. The focus will be on the comparison of different perspectives about significant events such as the government’s attempt to ban Communism in Australia, the Petrov Affair.

Economics

On your way to becoming financially independent! (Elective)

In order to be financially independent it is very likely that individuals will need to find employment and ensure that they maximize the value of their earnings. This course will help students to recognize their employment opportunities taking into account their likes and dislikes. It will look at goal setting, skills and qualifications and resume writing. Aspects of money management, such as budgeting, bill paying, and compound interest will also be considered. Staring a small business and superannuation will also be studied.

Money makes the world go round! (Elective) 

What is economics? Is it important? Economics has a crucial role to play in the well being of an individual and of a society. Students will investigate why living standards vary around the world. This course will investigate Australia’s economic system and compare it to other systems in order to understand why we have such high living standards. Students will select a country and complete a case study, comparing that country’s living standards with Australia’s. We are increasingly living in a globalized world. What does this mean and is it improving Australian and world living standards? What role does and should the Federal Government play in managing the economy and our lives? Students will also investigate some specific government policies such as; the mining and carbon tax, the Baby Bonus, paid parental leave, car industry subsidies, the National Broadband Network, raising the tax free threshold and lowering company tax rates.

Launch into Leadership (Elective)

Launch into Leadership aims to develop students’ leadership, communication and organizational skills as well as teamwork and negotiation skills.

Philosophy (Elective)

Philosophy is a program which seeks answers and encourages deeper thinking into areas of life that are not commonly discussed. Traditionally Philosophy is an inquiry-based subject; this has not changed since the Greeks formally taught it over 2500 years ago. Yet it remains relevant and intriguing still. In the Year 10 curriculum we seek answers concerning the self. Some of the topics which will be discussed are: “Who am I really?”, “What is friendship?” “Are there any implications in friendship?”, “Does everything change?”, “Beyond appearances what is beauty?”, “Can anything really be claimed beautiful?” Through the course students will learn how to conduct strong arguments through well grounded logic.

LEVEL 1 SEALP
Geography

This unit of work looks at physical processes, human interaction and management of water and oil as resources. Students will investigate the interaction of human activities with the resources and they will begin to design policies, and evaluate existing policies, for managing the impact of environmental issues and ensuring the sustainability of resources. Students will also be studying population’s movements, focusing on push pull factors and global population movements. This unit will also focus on the development of geographic skills and techniques in order to apply geographical knowledge to interpret environmental change.

History

Students will be introduced to the world of History.  They will come to understand how past events have shaped the world we know today.  In this subject, students will look at evidence from ancient times to come to an understanding of what life was like in these times.  They study the people, events and ideas that changed societies in the past and come to an understanding of why people behaved in the way they did.  Students will compare Ancient Societies’ daily life, social features and government with people in the modern world.  Students experience first-hand historical research using documents and oral historical evidence.

LEVEL 2 SEALP
Economics

Students develop an understanding of the nature of scarcity, opportunity, cost and resource allocation and how these influence the Australian economy.

Geography

Students undertake the study of mountain landscapes and the effects of culture and society on Australia. This unit will also focus on the development of geographic skills and techniques in order to apply geographical knowledge to the understanding of human and natural geography.

History

Students study Medieval Europe, Medieval Japan and the Black Death.  As well as studying how people lived in these times, students come to see the reasons why certain events in world history occurred and how they helped shape the world we know today.  Students compare two Medieval Societies (daily life, social features and government).

LEVEL 3 SEALP
The Level Three Year 9 SEAL students will undertake the broad study of Humanities at Level Three. They will cover the discipline areas of History, Geography and Economics. Through their study of History, students will examine the development of human rights over the 19th and 20th centuries as well as the impact of European colonisation of Australia.  Through their study of Geography, students will study the physical and human environments from a spatial perspective. Through their study of Economics students will, for example, come to understand how wealth is generated and distributed as well as how the nation’s work economy operates.  Students will develop their skills in these areas for example through document and map analysis, essay writing and data interpretation.

Local Community Project

The Local Community Project will allow the accelerated students to benefit and thrive academically through programs that offer them an opportunity to develop their skills in a more challenging environment. Students will be required to extend themselves both inside and outside the school setting whilst taking ownership of the task. They will be required to, work productively in teams; learn to operate in both leadership and support roles; problem solve; become self directed; review and reflect upon their progress and what they have learned throughout the program and at its conclusion. The Local Community Project will teach the students the skills required by VELS in the Humanities subjects of History, Geography and Economics through the course of the year.

 

VCE

Geography

This study focuses on the geography of place and change.

  • Unit 1 – Natural Environments
  • Unit 2 – Human Environments
  • Unit 3 – Regional Resources
  • Unit 4 – Global Perspectives

History

History is the practice of understanding and making meaning of the past. Students learn about their historical past, their shared history and the people, ideas and events that have created present societies.

  • Unit 1: Twentieth-Century History (1900-1945)
  • Unit 2: Twentieth-Century History (1990 – 2000)
  • Unit 3 – Australian History – Imagining Australia (1830 – 1914)
  • Unit 4 – Australian History (1914 – 2000)
  • Units 3 and 4:  Revolutions

Australian and Global Politics

  • Unit 1 – The National Citizen
  • Unit 2 – The Global Citizen
  • Unit 3 – Global threads
  • Unit 4 – Global cooperation and conflict

Accounting

  • Unit 1 – Establishing and Operating a Service Business
  • Unit 2 – Accounting for a Trading Business
  • Unit 3 – Recording and Reporting for a Trading Business
  • Unit 4 – Control and Analysis of Business Performance

Business Management

  • Unit 1 – Small Business Management
  • Unit 2 – Communication and Management
  • Unit 3 – Corporate Management
  • Unit 4 – Managing People and Change

Economics

  • Unit 1 – Economics: Choices and Consequences
  • Unit 2 – Economic Changes: Issues and Challenges
  • Unit 3 – Economic Activity and Objectives
  • Unit 4 – Economic Management

Legal Studies

  • Unit 1 – Criminal Law and Justice
  • Unit 2 – Civil Law and the Law in Focus
  • Unit 3 – Law Making
  • Unit 4 – Dispute Resolution

Philosophy

  • Unit 1: Existence, knowledge and reasoning
  • Unit 2: Ethics and philosophical investigation
  • Unit 3: The good life
  • Unit 4: Mind, science and knowledge